Category Archives: Call for Papers

CFP: Animating the Eighteenth-Century Country House

Organised by the Paul Mellon Centre, the National Gallery, and Birkbeck, University of London

5-6 March 2015

When we visit a Georgian country house, wander through its interiors, and stop to look across a rope at a particular arrangement of pictures and furniture, it is common to experience the sense we are looking at a snapshot of the past, a frozen moment of time. This impression of the country house as a static, unchanging environment belies a crucial aspect of such properties: the fact that, during the eighteenth century itself, they were continually in flux and being fashioned and experienced anew. Recent research encourages us to think afresh about such issues. Sources such as diaries, letters, inventories, catalogues and account books show country-house objects being inherited, gifted, purchased, removed and relocated, and provide evidence that the spaces in which such objects were located were subject to constant development and reconceptualization. Accordingly, this conference will focus on the Georgian country house as an environment that was always evolving, and that was animated by the interaction between objects and people.

This conference will look at the ways in which objects, when placed on display within a particular space – a room, a corridor, a garden – entered into different kinds of dialogue with the contents, decoration and associations of that environment, all of which were subject to change and adaptation. It will also explore the ways in which the evolving spaces of the country house, and the forms of display found within them, were experienced – by those who lived in the house, by those who visited as tourists or invited guests, and by those who engaged vicariously through the process of ‘armchair travel’, reading guidebooks and other contemporary accounts.

This two-day event, which will include a half-day visit to a local property, aims to bring together scholars from a variety of fields with the objective of animating the eighteenth-century country house. Proposals for contributions are welcomed from art historians and historians working on all aspects of the eighteenth-century country house, including architecture, painting, sculpture, the decorative arts and garden history.

We particularly welcome proposals for papers exploring the following topics:

  • Acquisition: the purchase, commissioning, inheritance, gifting of works of art, furniture, books and other materials.
  • Display: picture hangs; room arrangements and decorative schemes; the organisation of art collections within and between different properties owned by the same family; garden design and layout.
  • The country house as lived environment: the lived experience of the country house as a family home; as a site of hospitality; as a space in which artists may have worked.
  • The country house as tourist destination: country house tourism; visitor experience; the multifarious literature related to country houses, including guidebooks, regional guidebooks, and periodical articles.

Abstracts for 25 minute conference papers should be no longer than 300 words in length, and should be accompanied by a short biography (of no more than 100 words) detailing any work or recent publications of particular relevance. Please send abstracts and biographies by Monday 14 July to:
Amelia Smith, The National Gallery/Birkbeck, University of London
amelia.smith@ng-london.org.uk.

CFP: Animating the Eighteenth-Century Country House

Call for Papers

Animating the Eighteenth-Century Country House

5-6 March 2015

Organised by the Paul Mellon Centre, the National Gallery, and Birkbeck, University of London.

This conference aims to address the themes of art collecting, display, architecture, interiors and gardens by bringing together scholars working in a range of fields. Proposals are welcomed from art historians and historians working on all aspects of the eighteenth-century country house.

Animating the Eighteenth-Century Country House CFP

Abstracts for 25-minute conference papers should be no longer than 300 words in length, and should be accompanied by a short biography (of no more than 100 words) detailing any work or recent publications of particular relevance.

Please send abstracts by Monday 14 July 2014 to:

Amelia Smith
The National Gallery/Birkbeck, University of London
amelia.smith@ng-london.org.uk

 

CFP: Understanding British Portraits Annual Seminar

This year’s Understanding British Portraits Annual Seminar will take place on Wednesday 26 November 2014 at the National Portrait Gallery, London. Dr Ellen McAdam, Director of Birmingham Museums Trust has been confirmed as the co-chair of the event.

This Annual Seminar aims to highlight current scholarly research, museum-based learning programmes, conservation discoveries and curatorial practice relating to British portraits of all media and time periods. They are inviting proposals for 20-25 minute papers from professionals who would like to share case studies and ideas which relate to the aims of the seminar.

Hilliard, N. George Clifford, 3rd Earl of Cumberland, (c.1590). National Maritime Museum, Greenwich.
Hilliard, N. George Clifford, 3rd Earl of Cumberland, (c.1590). National Maritime Museum, Greenwich.

Understanding British Portraits is an active network with free membership for professionals working with British portraits including curators, museum learning professionals, researchers, academics and conservators. They aim to enhance the knowledge and understanding of portraits in all media in British collections, for the benefit of future research, exhibitions, interpretation, display and learning programmes.

Please send an outline of approximately 200 words, along with a brief biographical note, to mail@britishportraits.org.uk before Friday 13 June.

For more information, please visit http://www.britishportraits.org.uk/events/annual-seminar-2014/

CFP: Fashion, Function and Ornament – Accessorising the Long Eighteenth Century

A one-day symposium at the York Hilton Hotel and Fairfax House, Friday 19 September 2014

In fashion the term ‘accessory’ covers a wide range of items such as gloves, sashes, reticules, spectacles, watches, parasols, and potentially many other articles. Accessories can be seen as marginal to the nature of fashion, but historically they have played a key role in shaping the character of men’s and women’s fashions, combining ornament and function and giving scope for the expression of individual and collective identities. The era from the late Stuart to the early Victorian period saw the accessory achieve new prominence as a fashion statement, an expression of wealth, status and taste, and a desirable object of consumption, possession and display.

This symposium aims to bring together interested parties from curatorial, conservation, academic and other backgrounds with an interest in fashion, textiles, clothing and related topics to explore the nature and significance of accessories in the history of fashion from c.1660 to c.1840. Relevant topics to be addressed in contributions to the symposium may include (but would certainly not be limited to) the gender, class and identity dimensions of the accessory, collecting and collections cultures of consumerism and consumption, style, fashion and ornament, exoticism and the antique in accessory design and ornament, and the accessory in the visual and literary culture of the ‘long eighteenth century’.
Proposals are invited for symposium contributions not exceeding 20 minutes in length. Please send outlines of c.200 words to: fairfaxhousesymposium@gmail.com by Monday 28 July 2014. Please direct any queries about the symposium to the same email address.

Session Proposals: AAH Annual Conference 2015

Did you attend the Association of Art Historians’ annual conference last week? Were you inspired by the new research presented?

The AAH are calling for session proposals for AAH 2015 (Thurs 9 April – Saturday 11 April) at the Sainsbury Centre of Visual Arts, University of East Anglia, Norwich. This conference will highlight the breadth, diversity and vitality of art-historical research today.

AAH particularly welcome proposals for sessions which are:
• focused on a specific period and/or culture, and concerned with interrogating an issue or theme which is significant to current or emergent scholarship in that field, or
• concerned to explore an artistic or art-historical issue or theme across several or all periods and/or cultures, in an inclusive manner.
• characterized by cross-disciplinarity or which engage with the possibilities and/or limits of cross-disciplinarity for art history, or
• explicitly engaged with theoretical, historiographical, methodological and political issues (especially in their relevance to the study of art across periods and/or cultures).
• intended to be intellectually exploratory, provisional, open-ended or noncompliant.

To download a session proposal form, visit http://aah.org.uk/annual-conference/2015-conference

We particularly welcome proposals for sessions which are:
• focused on a specific period and/or culture, and concerned with interrogating an issue or theme which is significant to current or emergent scholarship in that field, or
• concerned to explore an artistic or art-historical issue or theme across several or all periods and/or cultures, in an inclusive manner
• characterized by cross-disciplinarity or which engage with the possibilities and/or limits of cross-disciplinarity for art history, or
• explicitly engaged with theoretical, historiographical, methodological and political issues (especially in their relevance to the study of art across periods and/or cultures)
• intended to be intellectually exploratory, provisional, open-ended or noncompliant – See more at: http://aah.org.uk/annual-conference/2015-conference#sthash.ZcikTAet.dpuf
will highlight the breadth, diversity and vitality of art-historical scholarship today. – See more at: http://aah.org.uk/annual-conference/2015-conference#sthash.ZcikTAet.dpuf
will highlight the breadth, diversity and vitality of art-historical scholarship today. – See more at: http://aah.org.uk/annual-conference/2015-conference#sthash.ZcikTAet.dpuf

CfP: Materials, Movements, Encounters: Modernist art networks and St Ives

Barbara Hepworth Stringed Figure (Curlew), Version II 1956, edition 1959
Barbara Hepworth Stringed Figure (Curlew), Version II 1956, edition 1959

Tate Research seminar
Saturday 21 June 2014
Porthmeor Studios, St Ives, Cornwall

Deadline for abstracts: Tuesday 22 April 2014

Keynote speakers
Dr Sarah Victoria Turner, The Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art
Dr Natalie Adamson, University of St Andrews

Materials, Movements, Encounters: Modernist art networks and St Ives is a one-day Tate Research seminar designed to explore the importance of artist networks to modernist production. The seminar aims to discuss how artist networks functioned, the ways in which they proliferated, and their impact upon our understanding of art as connected to place. Central to this discussion are movements by which people, materials, forms and ideas were distributed, traded and shared. In On the Move: Mobility in the Modern Western World, Tim Cresswell has suggested that mobility be considered ‘as progress, as freedom, as opportunity, and as modernity’, ‘as shiftlessness, as deviance, and as resistance’, and as ‘a kind of blank space that stands as an alternative to place, boundedness, foundation, and stability’.

Key to modernist artistic practice was the confluence and reciprocity of artist networks, whether through correspondence and travel, publication and exhibition, or through the exchange of materials and techniques. However, particularly within British art history, there has been a tendency to view artists’ outputs as rooted to a particular place. This has been especially true for modernist artists who lived and worked in St Ives, Cornwall, including Naum Gabo, Barbara Hepworth, Patrick Heron, Roger Hilton, Peter Lanyon and Ben Nicholson. With the opening of Tate St Ives in 1993, for instance, it was claimed that the new gallery would allow visitors to see works of the St Ives modernists ‘in the area in which they were conceived and close to the landscape and sea which influenced them’.

But can modernist trajectories be found that resist the rootedness of place? What kinds of artistic encounters were possible for those artists located in far-flung places? If the distribution of materials, ideas and people was regulated, more closely guarded, or even barred, what were the implications for artistic practice? What are the means with which we might trace artistic flows of ommunication and contact? And how might the display and study of artworks today communicate both the role of networks and artists’ complex relationships with place?

We welcome submissions from current or recently completed PhD candidates across the
humanities and social sciences. Subjects are not restricted to discussions of art in St Ives, but should either relate to an artist associated with the area for a time or provide helpful context to the theoretical or historical underpinnings of the seminar. Possible topics might include, but are not limited to:

- The role of artists’ colonies in Britain or abroad
– The experiences and effects of travel, migration or exile, such as with wartime and
postwar relocation to St Ives
– The role of published texts, including books, periodicals, exhibition catalogues and
collaborative projects, for dispersing ideas and stimulating debate
– Artists’ participation in – or experiences of – key exhibitions or displays in London, Paris,
North America or further afield, and international fora such as the Venice Biennale
– The role of commercial galleries for importing and exporting works, and stimulating
material, ideological and professional networks of exchange
– Artists’ relationships with their contemporaries, including other artists, authors, critics,
dealers, historians, patrons, scientists and friends
– The construction of regional, national and international artistic identities
– The effect of technological developments on travel and communication
– The role of professional and personal correspondence, or the values and challenges of
working with archives
– Re-presenting modernist narratives and networks in texts, diagrams or displays

The seminar will include curator-led tours of the Tate St Ives exhibition International Exchanges: Modern Art and St Ives 1915–1965 and a field trip for invited guests and seminar speakers on Sunday 22 June. A contribution towards the costs of travel and accommodation will be provided.

Please email abstracts of up to 250 words for 15-minute papers and a short biography to the convenors, Helena Bonett and Rachel Smith, at helena.bonett@tate.org.uk and
rachel.smith@tate.org.uk by Tuesday 22 April 2014.

The seminar is supported by the Heritage Lottery Fund

CFP: Invention and Imagination in British Art and Architecture, 600-1500

This conference will explore the ways in which artists and patrons in Britain devised and introduced new or distinctive imagery, styles and techniques, as well as novel approaches to bringing different media together. It is concerned with the mechanisms of innovation, with inventive and imaginative processes, and with the relations between conventions and individual expression. The conversation will therefore also address the very notions of sameness and difference in medieval art and architecture, and how these may be evaluated and explained historically.

Topics for discussion can include authorship, creativity, experimentation, envisaging, representation, and regulation by guilds or patrons, as well as case studies of particular objects, buildings, commissions or practices.

The conference will take place on 30th October to 1st November at the Paul Mellon Centre and The British Museum; it will include collaborations with the museum’s Department of Prehistory & Europe and opportunities to see works from the collection.

Papers should be of 20 minutes’ duration. Proposals/abstracts of 500 words should be submitted to Ella Fleming by 25 March 2014: efleming@paul-mellon-centre.ac.uk


Conference organised by the Paul Mellon Centre, with Sandy Heslop (University of East Anglia), Jessica Berenbeim (University of Oxford), Lloyd DeBeer and Naomi Speakman (The British Museum).

Call for Papers: BOOM! Growth, Form and Sustainable Bodies 1946-67

Call for papers: BOOM! Growth, Form and Sustainable Bodies 1946-67

4-5 April 2014

History of Art Department, University College London (UCL)

This conference is organised to coincide with the Richard Hamilton retrospective at the Tate Modern in February 2014, which will include the reconstruction of Growth and Form (ICA, 1951). Growth and Form negotiated a problematic that in the two decades after the end of WWII preoccupied different strands of artistic and architectural research across Europe. Namely, the effects of booming expansion – economic, demographic, urban, technological, material, visual – on the embodied subject within the context of a spreading capitalist pan-humanism championed abroad by the US. Some of the key historical coordinates that this conferences sets out to engage with in relation to cultural production include: Edward Steichen’s The Family of Man (1955), the baby boom, the discovery of the structure of DNA in 1954, the first tests of the H-bomb, postwar developments in cybernetics and artificial intelligence.

We encourage submissions for 30 minutes papers in the following areas of research: growth, reproducibility and sustainability as artistic strategies; urban growth, future habitats and exhibitions as habitats; technology, ecology and new sciences in art and exhibition making; humanism, ecology and sustainability; reproduction and feminist practices. We invite papers that address how artworks, films, images and exhibitions in the 1950s and early 60s mediated this experience within the boundaries of US-rescued Europe and explore the extent to which the local, national and global became increasingly interdependent for artists caught between the end of WWII and the early Cold War phase.

DEADLINE for submission: 31 January 2014

Abstracts should be no longer than 300 words. Please include your name, email address and institutional affiliation (where possible) at the end of the document.

Send to: BoomUCL@gmail.com

Call for Papers: The Courtauld 19th Annual Medieval Postgraduate Colloquium

The World Map from the 'Map Psalter', British Library. Image c. British Library Collections.
The World Map from the ‘Map Psalter’, British Library. Image c. British Library Collections.

Colloquium on 1st February 2014, The Courtauld Institute of Art; CFP Deadline: 22nd November 2013.

This colloquium aims to question the assumption that medieval art was governed by categories and boundaries by highlighting the fluidity and flexibility that existed within art and architecture at the time. The colloquium will explore the issue of the creation and articulation of boundaries, and how art ventured to transgress visual, architectural, and cultural divisions. This can include conventions and their adaptations both within one specific medieval culture, such as Islamic or Byzantine, or in a wider, trans-regional context. Participants are invited to interpret boundaries in the wider sense of the word, encompassing geographical locations, artistic media, architectural spaces, or cultural traditions, and to examine their visual and spatial subversion. This theme can be expanded to include questions of in-betweenness and hybridity, where boundaries are kept intact or become blurred without being fully discarded.

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Call for Papers: Art in the Age of Real Abstraction

Paul Klee, Fire in the Evening, 1929. Image c. Wikipedia Commons.
Paul Klee, Fire in the Evening, 1929. Image c. Wikipedia Commons.

Conference: April 12th, 2014, UCL; CFP Deadline: December 15th, 2013.

Historic iterations of abstraction in the visual arts have traditionally been associated with terms such as the non-representational, the non-figurative, and the immaterial, in opposition to a loosely defined concept of realism. In the post-war period, however, both realism and abstraction became unstable concepts, deployed to refer to a range of diverse practices, from Nouveau Réalisme to Art Informel to Abstract Expressionism. This conference invites papers that rethink the relation between realism and abstraction in the period between 1970 and the contemporary moment. Of particular concern are the impacts of two intersecting events: the advent of Neoliberalism and the dismantling of Modernism in art history.

‘Art in the Age of Real Abstraction’ seeks to investigate contemporary forms of abstraction through the analysis of different modes of representation, affectivity and performativity, drawing lines of continuity and addressing points of ambiguity between post-war abstraction and contemporary iterations. In recent critical discourse reification has been described as both a process of abstraction and as a figural process. On this view ‘Real Abstraction’ might be understood as the becoming-concrete of the abstract. As such ‘Real Abstraction’ calls for a rethinking of what the terms realism, figuration and abstraction might mean today.

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